Personal criteria for success

Before making career or life planning decisions, it’s important to do some research first and define your own personal criteria for “success”. Your criteria should be clearly established in your mind then regularly updated on your changing circumstance and lessons learned over time. Otherwise making quick decisions could send you off in a wrong direction, perhaps a direction you really didn’t want to go.

I have found that going back to square one really does help concentrate the mind. You need to identify your choices and your deep routed core-values. To do this you need to ask yourself some very searching questions. You must be completely honest with yourself. Kidding yourself and putting things down that are untrue will not help you make the correct decisions and do not help.

Core-values

Your core-values are your traits and qualities that you consider worthwhile and very important to you. They represent your highest priorities and deeply held beliefs they are your driving forces. When you are in an organisation you bring your deeply held core-values and beliefs to that organisation or business, there they mingle with the values of other members, helping to create a better organisation or family culture which you are very comfortable with and are able to work within.

Value statements

Your core-value statements are grounded in your core-values and your beliefs; they define how people want to behave with each other in an organisation, an institution, company and within your family and social circles.  They are statements about how an organisation will value its customers, suppliers and of course its own employees. Value-statements describe actions which are the enactment of your fundamental core-values that you held within the above-mentioned communities

2 replies
  1. Geoffrey Prince
    Geoffrey Prince says:

    Hi Geoff
    I will be holding a number of interviews as we are considering a position for a salesperson, your core values blog has resonated with me.
    I intend to ask applicants what their core values are, why they want to work with CDP, what will they bring to the table in effect.
    Do you have any advice please?
    Paul Scanlon

    Reply
    • Geoffrey Prince
      Geoffrey Prince says:

      Good morning Paul and a Happy and prosperouse New Year. In my oppinion ask them for their interpritation of their values gives you an idea of the way they think and the way you will understand the way they could possibly give to you and the business. I always think that to email them a SWOT analysis for them to fill in first is a good theing (I can email you) this gives a basis for the discussion. geoffre@geoffreyprince.com. Nice to here from yo again Paul. Geoffrey

      Reply

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